Monday, 26 September 2016

No Five from Prince George: Getting back to basics of expectations



That’s really low five: not just for Justin Trudeau but also for British Prince George. Oh well if you haven’t seen this one, The Canadian prime minister was shut down while trying to greet Britain’s Prince George on the runway when the royal family arrived for their tour of British Columbia.

I guess now you are wondering why this news is published at a Technology Company’s blog, bear with me on the analogy here.  What Prince George did or didn’t has nothing to do with British reserve or any other predictions that’s been going on in the news outlets. With due respect Prince George is a child, and every child has its own inhibitions when it comes to greeting strangers. He being Prince has created a huge expectation out of him and that of his actions. While his action is completely justifiable it still creates a stir, an awkward media scene and juicy scoop for journalists.

Expectations out of a child and that of a small company is no different. And that’s what I want to talk to you about, getting back to the basics of expectations. We are a Company based in Singapore with expandable workforce. And often like the situation mentioned above, high expectations are set for us from our stake holders, employees and also from our clients. All expectations are justified, for high expectation means we are regarded high from the other party’s mind. However, there are few things we can do to tackle the low five moments of a project when it comes to setting the expectations.


Freezing Requirements:

They say walking on water and meeting high requirement is possible, if both are frozen. Often it is difficult to foresee all the requirements when it comes to creating a custom software development project. However, it’s imperative to freeze at least the fundamentals to ensure the right expectation is set.


Closure:

Any brainstorming session or requirement gathering meeting can throw several options for delivering a business task. After all that discussion it’s important to agree on one of several objectives to carry out the task. Closure not just means agreeing on the aspects of the project but also ensuring a clean delivery timeline and responsibility chart is made. As Rachel of FRIENDS would say that’s what I call “a Closure”.


Evolving Timeline:

Even writing about it is such a critical task. While the project evolves, so does the requirements. The basic requirements such as a simple numeric field can become a calculated complex output algorithm. It’s wise to revisit the timeline and decide what needs to go on for the first release and also agree on the changes to the overall timeline.


Get back to Basics:

There is no secret ingredient to delivering projects with high expectations on the desired timeline. In fact, it’s all in the basics of agreeing to requirements, closure, Timeline negotiation and a practical project discussion from both parties.  From signing the requirement document to creating a custom made test cases, any custom software development project is a collaborative and immense learning process for both parties. And just like low five, sometimes it’s all about having perspective and turning those awkward situations into moments of understanding the differences, and finding workarounds in completing the common goals.

On a totally unrelated note, this is our 100th blog post! and I wish to thank all those who have supported us in this journey.There you go folks, perhaps you might be interested to know more about the cost of custom software or the importance of Analytics & Reporting.  Customized Software Development is a cake walk with the right consultant. Contact us at the below numbers / email to get a free no obligation quote for your custom requirement. Thanks for stopping by and have a fantastic day!



Srivatsan Aravamudan
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